Historic preservation

A stroll through downtown Charleston

May 13, 2014

Charleston After a busy few days at The Southern C Summit, I gave myself an extra day to explore Charleston. So before some last minute shopping and more eating, I set out on an early morning stroll to photograph a few of my favorite buildings. READ MORE

Olive & Sinclair

February 12, 2014

Once home to HG Hills Food Store in the early 1900s, an Archway Cookies factory, and a woodworking factory, 1628 Fatherland Street, Nashville, Tennessee is now home to one of my favorite chocolatiers, Olive & Sinclair. 

Olive & Sinclair

via Olive & Sinclair

Nashville-based DAAD Architects under Nick Dryden were brought on this project to ensure the circa-1890 building’s historic bones would be preserved, while creating a functional factory. The updated space features elements such as glass deco-lighting from a 1930’s schoolhouse, a gothic communion table from the early 1900‘s serving as the factory’s retail counter, factory pendant lighting was repurposed from an army barracks outside Atlanta , even repurposed wood floors sourced from a neighboring house in Lockeland Springs.  READ MORE

Student Building

January 5, 2014

Student Building IU Student Building

 

Student Building, Indiana University

Located in the Old Crescent, the Student Building was built in 1906 and originally housed a gymnasium, parlor, pool, and auditorium for student recreation. It was designed by Vonnegut & Bohn, an architectural firm active in early- to mid-twentieth-century Indianapolis, Indiana. Today the Anthropology and Geography departments are located here.

Franklin Hall

December 8, 2013

IU Franklin HallIU Franklin Hall

Indiana University Franklin Hall circa 1908- Bloomington, Indiana

“A good book is the precious life-blood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond lift.” John Milton

Located in the historic center of IU’s Bloomington campus known as the “Old Crescent,” Franklin Hall housed one of the first libraries on campus and is currently an administration building.

#Presconf Indy

November 20, 2013

It’s been a couple of weeks since my trip down the road Indy for the National Preservation Conference. Aptly entitled Preservation at the Crossroads, this year’s conference took a hard look at the future of preservation, our roles as preservationists, how to stay relevant, and how to attract new audiences to our cause.

I don’t currently work in preservation proper; however, I still consider myself a preservationist. Newly transplanted in the Midwest from the deep South, I joined the social media team for Indiana Landmarks to meet some new folks, check out Indy, and reintroduce myself to the world of preservation. Here are some of my takeaways from this year’s preservation conference.

5. Indy is beautiful.

I’m so glad I squeezed in some time to walk around downtown Indy. Like Mayor Ballard said at the opening plenary, “I bet most of you will leave Indy saying, I never knew.” So true; I had no idea. Look forward to coming back!

4. Times they are a changing.

Preservation Conference Stephanie Meeks’ opening speech began this notion of change in my mind that seemed to carry throughout my conference experience. Here are a few poignant quotes I managed to scribble and tweet.

“Is it time to move away from the house museum as our “go to” strategy for preservation?”- Stephanie Meeks. “Historic Preservation should be focused more about quality of life and less about history.”- Gustavo Araoz.  “Always let people comment. Even if they’re crazy.” -@presnation twitter

Are we becoming more laid-back? Or are we just realizing that the more inclusive preservation is the more we can achieve? Perhaps a little of both.

hippies

 

There also seemed to be a new catch phrase to describe advocacy and membership tactics to attract the elusive “young, engaged, and diverse” crowd preservation is after: “Preservation through the back door.” Couldn’t help but think of this…

 

 

3. Preservationists are jumping on the social media bandwagon.

presconf

#presconf tweetup; Me and Kaitlin

One of the biggest challenges for preservation has been spreading the preservation gospel to the unconverted; thanks to social media, the message is spreading a little faster. The presconf tweetup was the biggest to date and the New Media, New Audiences session led by Kaitlin O’Shea of Preservation in Pink was packed. It was great to finally meet many preservation bloggers/tweeters I’ve been following for a while!

2. Don’t be stodgy.

presconf coaster

Landmark Society of Western New York Coaster

Preservation doesn’t have to be boring. With some creativity and strategic partnerships, preservation can be fun, dare I say cool. An inspiring and important session was Cocktails, Coloring Books, and Cyberspace in which the Landmark Society of Western New York introduced several of their new advocacy and membership tools. My favorite? The “Where the #&@$ am I? coaster. The Landmark Society will partner with historic bars in Rochester, New York in order to have these coasters available for patrons. Each coaster has a QR code specific to that bar; when scanned, the code will direct the user to a website that will tell the history of the bar and show it’s location. Pretty genius.

1. Just Do It.

Art, Heritage, and Quality of Life: Lessons from the Venice Biennale preached a “just do it” approach to public places, heritage, and art. Traditional preservation work can be quite tedious because of bureaucratic red tape but this session left me feeling inspired to work on a few preservation projects I’ve kept on the back burner for a while now. The Howling Mob Society (bottom left), New Public Sites (top left), and M12 Studio (right), reminded us that it can be quite liberating to operate outside the lines.

Bonus takeaway: Verncaular architecture rockstar and keynote speaker, Henry Glassie, holds a striking resemblance to Sam Elliot. Thanks Tiffany from Historic Indianapolis for pointing that out!

henry glassie

Thank you again to Indiana Landmarks for the opportunity to work on the social media team! Stay tuned for more about my upcoming preservation projects.

 

Sunday funday photo

November 10, 2013

victorian A weekend in Georgia calls for an oldie from my days surveying in Hancock County, Georgia.

 

Sunday funday photo

November 3, 2013

Indianapolis

Snapshots of a morning stroll around Memorial Circle and the Indiana State House.

Preservation at the Crossroads- Indianapolis

October 24, 2013

presconf

The National Preservation Conference is one week away! I’m thrilled to be attending another #presconf (Austin was my last one) and working with Indiana Landmarks on their social media team! Hashtags at the ready- #presconf, #Indy #Indiana.

While refreshing my preservation-isms and session planning, I ran across a favorite preservation blog from my grad school days at UGA.

ryan gosling

via Preservationist Ryan Gosling

Preservationist Ryan Gosling is a tumblr created by some students at UPenn’s preservation program with photos of good lookin’ Ryan Gosling and historic preservation facts and opinions. Pretty hilarious. Here are some of my favs…

ryan gosling

via Preservationist Ryan Gosling

ryan gosling

via preservationist ryan gosling

ryan gosling

via Preservationist Ryan Gosling

It doesn’t look like they’re updating the site anymore but it’s worth a gander. Check it out here.

If you can’t make it to Indy this year follow along with me @emsontheroad on Twitter and Instagram. Stay tuned!

Related:

Oh the places you’ll go… (emsontheroad.com)

 

 

Sunday funday photo

October 13, 2013

Mission Delores

 

Beautiful Mission San Francisco de Asís was founded June 29, 1776 and is both the oldest original intact Mission in California and the oldest building in San Francisco.

World Architecture Day

October 7, 2013

 

mid century mod port townsend port townsend

Happy World Architecture Day! This day is celebrated on the first Monday of every October and was set up by the Union International des Architects in 2005 to “remind the world of its collective responsibility for the future of the human habitat.” For more check out World Architecture Day 2013.

I believe part of that responsibility is to maintain and celebrate existing and historic architecture. I wanted to share a few of my favorite images from a recent trip to Port Townsend, Washington. “The official settlement of the city took place on the 24th of April, 1851. Called the “City of Dreams” because of the early speculation that the city would be the largest harbor on the west coast, wealthy and prosperous, somehow though, those early dreams failed to materialize…”-Port Townsend Guide

If you love old buildings, it’s a great place to see large number of Victorian era architecture.  My visit to Port Townsend was my first to a small town on the west coast. I found it refreshing that the majority of the old buildings here seem to be embraced by the community with many of the local businesses occupying the historic downtown area.

 

 

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